Friday, March 25, 2016

AASWOMEN Newsletter for March 25, 2016

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of March 25, 2016
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Elysse Voyer, & Heather Flewelling

This week's issues:

1. The Status of Undergraduate Women at MIT

2. Career Profiles: Petrologist to Planetary Scientist

3. 12 Quotes From Incredible Female Scientists That Will Inspire You To Reach Higher

4. 11 Of History's Greatest Female Scientists

5. When a woman's body at work is seen as a liability, everyone loses

6. When Woman Is Boss: Nikola Tesla on Gender Equality and How Technology Will Unleash Women’s True Potential

7. Barriers For Women Today May Be Less Visible, But Not Less Real

8. NASA's Female Leaders Share Challenges of Working in Male-Dominated Field

9. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues


1. The Status of Undergraduate Women at MIT
From Ed Bertschinger via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Four weeks ago, MIT released a report detailing the experience and success of its undergraduate women. Written by two undergraduates, with the support of the MIT Office of Institutional Research, the report assesses differences in experience and outcomes regarding academics, leadership, climate, and confidence. Caroline Chin and Kamilla Tekiela have done an outstanding job in summarizing the experience of many women entering the STEM fields. In short, they find that women are on average as successful or more successful than their male classmates, but they are less confident and do not feel as strongly supported by others.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/03/the-status-of-undergraduate-women-at-mit.html

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2. Career Profiles: Petrologist to Planetary Scientist
From Stuart Vogel via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy and the AAS Employment Committee have compiled dozens of interviews highlighting the diversity of career trajectories available to astronomers. The interviews share advice and lessons learned from individuals on those paths.

Below is our interview with Harold C. Connolly Jr, a geologist turned planetary scientist. He describes his career as a professor and mission scientist for OSIRIS-REx. If you have questions, suggestions, advice to share, etc. about this career path, please leave a comment below.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/03/career-profiles-petrologist-to.html

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3. 12 Quotes From Incredible Female Scientists That Will Inspire You To Reach Higher
From Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Lisa Winter

March is Women's History Month, and we at A Plus are excited to bring you a four-part series honoring women who have made incredible contributions to scientific discovery and pushed the boundaries of human knowledge. Historically, women in STEM fields have had a difficult time finding opportunities to learn or getting proper credit for their achievements. Understandably, this has turned many women off to science, and demanded a lot of tenacity from those who stayed with it.

Read more at

http://aplus.com/a/female-scientist-quotes

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4. 11 Of History's Greatest Female Scientists
From Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Lisa Winter

March is Women's History Month, and we at A Plus are excited to bring you a 4-part series honoring women who have made incredible contributions to scientific discovery and pushed the boundaries of human knowledge. Throughout history, women have had difficulties seeking education, finding employment doing research, and getting credit for their work. Even still, there are plenty of women who have overcome all of these obstacles in order to make their marks on history.

Read more at

http://aplus.com/a/women-in-science-greatest-female-scientists

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5. When a woman's body at work is seen as a liability, everyone loses

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

By Rebecca Ruiz

For millions of women, a job is an opportunity to work hard and provide for their families. But once in a workplace, women may find it a complicated space to navigate.

A woman can be talented, driven and creative, but she's often painfully aware that her body, and what it means to others, can raise questions about her performance or even derail personal success.

Whether she's being sexually harassed or trying to navigate the workplace through pregnancy, maternity leave and daily pumping breaks, a woman is never far from suddenly feeling like her body is a liability.

Read more at

http://mashable.com/2016/03/10/womens-bodies-at-work/#bqME2k1FWkq7

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6. When Woman Is Boss: Nikola Tesla on Gender Equality and How Technology Will Unleash Women’s True Potential
From John Mather [johncm12_at_gmail.com]

by Maria Popova

Engineer, physicist, and futurist Nikola Tesla (July 10, 1856–January 7, 1943) is among the most radical rule-breakers of science and is regarded by many as the greatest inventor in human history. His groundbreaking work paved the way for wireless communication and imprinted every electrical device we use today. Without Tesla, I wouldn’t be writing these words on this keyboard and you wouldn’t be reading them on this screen. But like all true geniuses, Tesla envisioned not only the practical applications of his inventions but the profound cultural shifts that any successful technology precipitates. One of the most surprising, most obscure, yet most incisive of Tesla’s predictions peers into the future of society’s changing gender roles and considers how the advent of wireless technology would empower women, liberating us to develop our full intellectual potential repressed by the patriarchy for centuries.

Read more at

https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/07/10/nikola-tesla-when-woman-is-boss/?mc_cid=0bae3fff91&mc_eid=6ec9781ec2

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7. Barriers For Women Today May Be Less Visible, But Not Less Real
From Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Tania Lombrozo

Last month, I wrote a review of Eileen Pollack's The Only Woman in the Room, a memoir about Pollack's experiences as a physics major at Yale in the 1970s. It's no secret that women are still underrepresented in science and engineering, and my own piece cited a statistic from 2015: that women make up fewer than 25 percent of physics majors today. So I was surprised by a theme that emerged in comments to the article, both on Facebook and on 13.7.

Read more at

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/03/21/471234948/barriers-for-women-today-may-be-less-visible-but-not-less-real

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8. NASA's Female Leaders Share Challenges of Working in Male-Dominated Field
From Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Calla Cofield

They may have taken very different roads to arrive at their current jobs, but many of NASA's top female administrators have at least one thing in common: They have shared the experience of being a woman in a male-dominated field. On March 16, these top NASA leaders shared their experiences with a crowd of female high school students at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The event, held in partnership with the White House Council on Women and Girls, was part of Women's History Month, and featured a panel of speakers that included Ellen Ochoa, former space shuttle astronaut and current director of NASA's Johnson Space Center; Lesa Roe, NASA's deputy associate administrator; Ellen Stofan, NASA's chief scientist; and Dava Newman, the agency's deputy administrator. At the event, the four women shared the stories of how they found their way to NASA, and their individual stories reflect four very different personalities.

Read more at

http://www.space.com/32317-nasa-female-leaders-womens-history-month.html

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9. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

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11. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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